Jeanloup Sieff

Ella used to frequent a seedy and unsavory online community where many debased degenerates used to gather to revel in their shameless depravity. (Can you tell that I miss them?)

When the other libertines noticed that Ella appreciated black and white photography, they began sharing samples of the work of their favorite photographers. One of the least savory characters, claiming to be a social worker in Moscow with a mysterious connection to the city of Wuppertal, introduced me to the sensational work of Jeanloup Sieff by posting the following three photos, without comment or caption.

20130205-161145.jpg

20130205-161155.jpg

20130205-161206.jpg

These three images were so electrifying to me that I began keeping a list of my favorite photographers as a result. I did not want to forget the name Jeanloup Sieff.

20130205-161554.jpg

20130205-161615.jpg

20130205-161944.jpg

Born in Paris in 1933, Sieff was a famous fashion photographer in the 60s.

20130205-162112.jpg

20130205-162122.jpg

20130205-162132.jpg

20130205-162143.jpg

20130205-162227.jpg

20130205-162318.jpg

20130205-162331.jpg

He also took some memorable portraits in the era:

20130205-162432.jpg
^Catherine Deneuve.

20130205-162634.jpg
^Alfred Hitchcock.

20130205-162807.jpg
^Yves Saint Laurent

Sieff is arguably best known for his black and white nudes, of which I will only post one of my favorites.

20130205-163430.jpg

His landscapes were similarly superb.

20130205-163633.jpg

20130205-163641.jpg

And, as may be noted in the Hitchcock portraits as well as much of his other work, he had a sense of humor.

20130205-163819.jpg

Thank you, erstwhile Moscow ne’er-do-well for introducing me to the work of this great photographer.

More of Jeanloup Sieff’s work may be seen here.

Rudi Gernreich

Rudi Gernreich, arguably most famous for the topless swimsuits he launched in the 60s, was a driving force in the sartorial revolution of the 60s in the U.S.

 

20130124-212231.jpg
^Here, Peggy Moffitt models his first topless swimsuit design. It is 1964.

 

20130124-212501.jpg
Noted for his penchant for androgyny, his swimwear was as unisex as nature would allow.

 

20130124-213010.jpg

20130124-213026.jpg
^The Monokini for which he is still known, 50 years later.^

 

20130124-213139.jpg

I have read that Gernreich's topless suits launched the topless beach craze, though I have also read that the swimwear was not a commercial home run. Not so, his famous 'No Bra', which was a best seller from Day One.

 

20130124-214634.jpg

20130124-214642.jpg

20130124-214650.jpg

It seems so mundane nowadays; a sheer bra with no wire or padding. At the time, it was nothing short of revolutionary. Bras before this were made to change the shape of a woman's breasts; not celebrate their natural shape.

But Gernreich also designed more than swimwear and underwear.

 

20130124-215939.jpg
^Here, Peggy Moffitt models a Gernreich look in 1971.

More of Gernreich's creative work:

 

20130124-220957.jpg

20130124-221012.jpg

20130124-221022.jpg

20130124-221036.jpg

20130124-221132.jpg
^With his model and muse, Peggy Moffitt.

A quasi-famous video of Peggy Moffitt sporting Gernreich looks, filmed by Moffitt's husband, longtime collaborator of Gernreich's, photographer William Claxton, called 'Basic Black' is said to be the first fashion video.

 

Paco Rabanne

Maybe you’ve seen the famous Rabanne tunic from the Sixties.

20130120-083354.jpg
Plates of aluminum linked together.

The designer made a name for himself with these oddly appealing creations.

20130120-083527.jpg

20130120-083542.jpg
^A wedding dress of white leather and chain links.^

20130120-084345.jpg

20130120-084355.jpg

20130120-084405.jpg

20130120-084419.jpg

20130120-084429.jpg

20130120-084440.jpg
^Audrey Hepburn in a Paco Rabanne mini for the film ‘Two for the Road’.

Rabanne collaborated with Jacques Fonteray to create the costumes for ‘Barabarella’ in 1968.

20130120-092150.jpg

For more on Fonda’s ‘Barabarella’ costumes, go here.

Rabanne continued designing and running his brand into the 90s but sold to Puig in 2000.

As of June, 2012, the Creative Director for the brand was Lydia Maurer, though the brand changes designers so frequently that this may not be current information.

Clearly the young designers running the brand are determined to maintain some connection to Mr. Rabanne’s aesthetic, as these selections from the Paco Rabanne Spring 2013 RTW collection demonstrate.

20130120-093502.jpg

20130120-093516.jpg

20130120-093530.jpg

20130120-093548.jpg

20130120-093558.jpg

Make It Rain

Ella’s wet, and not in a hot way.

Third day of rain.

Fashion photographers, take me away!

20130115-173003.jpg

20130115-173141.jpg
^Two by the brilliant Rodney Smith.^

20130115-173648.jpg
^David Bailey^

20130115-173915.jpg
A fave! By Norman Parkinson

20130115-174205.jpg
^Also Norman Parkinson^

20130115-174401.jpg
^Patrick DeMarchelier^ (Her shoes!)

20130115-222434.jpg
^The incomparable Tim Walker, whose prop-and set-heavy shots were in every issue of Vogue USA for awhile.

20130115-222745.jpg
^Tim Walker, again^

20130115-223947.jpg
^Peter Lindbergh^

20130115-225423.jpg
^Dominique Issermann^

Paris fashion photos

Seeing the photos of Paris at styleonthecouch has brought back such lovely memories of our Christmas in Paris last year. Rather than get lost in nostalgic wistfulness, or perhaps taking my nostalgic wistfulness to the next level, I was inspired to put together a collage of photos taken in Paris by some of my favorite fashion photographers.

Norman Parkinson is always a great place to start.

20130106-103830.jpg

Here, Suzy Parker and Robin Tattersall skate on the Place de la Concorde, by Richard Avedon.

20130106-105410.jpg

Also Avedon; shoe by Perugia on the Place du Trocadéro. (Ella melts!)

20130106-105947.jpg

You may not be able to tell this was taken in Paris, but it was. Avedon’s wonderful shot of the lovely Dorian Leigh.

20130106-110648.jpg

Of all that Paris has to offer, it is this that I enjoyed and miss the most; sitting at a sidewalk cafe, watching the most stylish people on earth hustle past. Here Paris street photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson captures a moment in the sartorial revolution.

20130106-113154.jpg
Here, the steps at Montmarte. By Brassai. Not a fashion photo, but full of swoon factor nonetheless.

20130106-113746.jpg

My favorite photo of all time; Helmut Newton’s iconic composition featuring YSL’s ‘le smoking’ on Paris’ Rue Aubriot. *swoon!*

20130106-115240.jpg